Mercury Head Dime

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  1. Mercury Head Dimes
  2. See Full List On Usacoinbook.com
  3. 1916 D
  4. Mercury Head Dime 1942

The Mercury dime is a ten-cent coin struck by the United States Mint from late 1916 to 1945. Designed by Adolph Weinman and also referred to as the Winged Liberty Head dime, it gained its common name because the obverse depiction of a young Liberty, identifiable by her winged Phrygian cap, was confused with the Roman god Mercury. The Mercury dime is a ten-cent coin struck by the United States Mint from late 1916 to 1945. Designed by Adolph Weinman and also referred to as the Winged Liberty Head dime, it gained its common name because the obverse depiction of a young Liberty, identifiable by her winged Phrygian cap, was confused with the Roman god Mercury. Play kino. The silver coins are also known as Winged Liberty Head Dimes which is probably a more accurate title even if most coin enthusiasts do not routinely use it. 1923 Mercury Dime The U.S. Mint struck each Mercury Dime from 90% silver with 0.0723 ounces of the precious metal. Mercury dimes are very popular ten-cent pieces produced by the United States Mint from 1916 to 1945. This dime is composed of 90 percent silver and 10 percent copper. The coin contains a total of just over.072 troy ounces of silver. The Mercury Dime is also commonly referred to as the Winged Liberty Head Dime and was designed by Adolph Weinman. Mercury Dimes produced by the Denver Mint that same year are popular among numismatists, as well. One of the most critical years for the Mercury Dime series in 1942, with two major versions made. The 1942/1 was made in Philadelphia, again without a mint mark, and the 1942/1-D was struck in Denver, with the standard “D” included on the reverse.

  • 1943 Mercury Dime
Joshua McMorrow-Hernandez
Mercury Head Dime

Coin Info

$1.97
United States
Silver Coin
0.07234 t oz

Mercury Head Dimes

$0.10 USD
324,059,000
U.S. Mint
1943

With no overdates, no proofs, and well more than 300 million Mercury dimes struck, 1943 is a highly affordable date for aficionados of the Winged Liberty Head dime series. Common across virtually all grades, 1943 Mercury dimes pose few collecting challenges for numismatists, save for those who want ultra high-grade specimens with fully split bands (FSB). Such high-caliber pieces are scarce, even for the high-production year of 1943, though not out of the question for coin collectors with a few pretty pennies to spare.

See Full List On Usacoinbook.com

Here’s a look at mintage figures and values for 1943 Mercury dimes:

  • 1943, 191,710,000 minted; $4

  • 1943-D, 71,949,000; $4

  • 1943-S, 60,400,000; $4

*Values are for coins in a grade of Extremely Fine-40.

If you’re seeking 1943 Mercury dimes in gem MS-65 grades, you could theoretically buy an example from each of the three mints (Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco) for under $100 total. You’ll need to spend more to purchase FSB specimens from that year, but they are available and usually at a price that won’t break the budget. Crisp, white Mercury dimes with blazing luster and clean (not cleaned) surfaces are a true treasure for Mercury dime aficionados, and an acquisition that, should the time come that you sell your 1943 dimes, may bring many great returns.

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  • 1940 Mercury Dime
Joshua McMorrow-Hernandez

Coin Info

$1.97
United States

1916 D

Silver Coin
0.07234 t oz
$0.10 USD
Head
108,119,827
U.S. Mint
1940

Mercury Head Dime 1942

1940 was another year during which more than 100 million Mercury dimes were minted, providing plenty of specimens of this coin for collectors today. 1940 Mercury dimes are widely available in virtually all grades, with those in the lower circulated grades priced right around the prevailing silver bullion value. These cheap prices make the 1940 Mercury dime an affordable acquisition for Mercury dime aficionados and type coin collectors alike, with good deals to be had for examples of this date right up to the uncirculated grade levels.

Here’s a look at the mintages and values for 1940 Mercury dimes:

  • 1940, 65,350,000 minted; $4

  • 1940 proof, 11,827; $400

  • 1940-D, 21,198,000; $4

  • 1940-S, 21,560,000; $4

*Values are for coins in a grade of Extremely Fine-40, unless otherwise noted.

This date is easy to locate in the mint state grades, with pieces in MS-63 costing collectors around $20. A crisp MS-65 can be had for under $50. With a little extra searching, you should be able to find a fully split bands (FSB) piece for a small premium – well worth the extra few dollars for a coin with complete detail in the horizontal lines of the bands surrounding the fasces.

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