1965 Quarter Value

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Clad quarters weigh 5.67 grams. The present coin, which is made of 90% silver, weighs 6.26 grams, the approximate weight of the 1964 quarter. Evidently a sliver planchet remained in a tote bin crevice and later was dislodged and mixed in with the clad planchets. The period between 1964 and 1965 was a busy time at the U.S. Mint as it transitioned away from 90 percent silver dimes, quarter dollars and half dollars, moving the first two to a copper-nickel. This is the first year in which the Mint struck Clad Washington Quarters. The 1965 circulation strike Quarter is really common in most grades. Lottery results jackpot triple play. It is considered somewhat scarce in MS65 condition. In MS66 it is scarcer with a few thousands examples probably in existence. While commemorative quarters have inspired many to collect coins, value is determined by rarity and condition, so the most valuable quarters include several of the oldest that were kept out of circulation, long before coin collecting became a popular hobby. These 20 quarters are worth a combined $7.9 million. 1927-S Full Head Standing Liberty.

History and Collection of1965 QuarterandOther Clad Washington Quarters

The Washington quarter was issued to commemorate the 200th birth anniversary of George Washington. It was designed by John Flanagan, a New York sculptor. His initials are found at the base of the coin, particularly below Washington’s neck.

The coin’s outer layer is composed of 75% copper and 25% nickel while the inner core is pure copper. It weighs 5.67 grams and measures 24.3 millimeters in diameter.

The obverse features a bust of President George Washington facing left, with inscriptions “LIBERTY” on top and the year below. The reverse features an eagle with outstretched wings and the inscription “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA”, and QUARTER DOLLAR.

Value

History

The 1965 quarter was the first clad coin in circulation. It was called “the key coin for commerce” by Robert Wallace; assistant secretary of the Treasury Coin hoarding was rampant in 1964 due to shortage of coins.

Prices of silver then were on the rise, and the Treasury continued to strike 1964-coins into 1965. However, continued coin production depleted the stock of silver and prices of the said metal kept rising that by June 1965, silver dollar coin had 93.3 cents’ worth at market prices.

This led to President Lyndon Johnson’s decision to eliminate silver from the quarter and dime and resorted to a clad composition of copper-nickel on both sides of pure copper layer. Half dollar coins were changed from 90% to 40% silver.

If you are a beginner who wants to start collecting 1965 or other Washington quarters, you can have a date and mint mark collection of circulated coins from 1965. These clad coins can still be easily found.

The Coinage Act of 1965 formalized the production of 1964-dated silver quarters to 1965-dated clad quarters. In 1965 to 1967, new clad quarters were issued with no mint marks regardless of mint of origin.

Minting started on August 1965, and the clad era began with quarter coins. Thus, the year 1965 is significant for it was the year when silver was taken off from the quarter’s composition.

Numismatists soundly rejected copper-nickel clad coins even though they are new and different. Most collectors were not interested with these coins for they were not silver and they were produced in such large quantities.

Collecting the 1965 Quarter and other Washington Quarters

From 1968, the Washington quarter’s proof versions have been created at San Francisco mint, carrying the “S” mark. Supplies of these coins are plentiful.

If you are a beginner who wants to start collecting 1965 or other Washington quarters, you can have a date and mint mark collection of circulated coins from 1965. These clad coins can still be easily found.

It is best to have a complete collection of these Washington quarter coins, especially the silver ones though this may be quite challenging.

The coins from 1932 to 1964 are rare to find, but you can buy them from dealers. You can collect the complete series of uncirculated Washington quarters or their proof versions.

If you would like to collect the whole series of Washington quarters, you need to complete a total of 147 coins. Beginners in coin collecting can start by assembling the circulated clad quarters from 1965.

Mint marks and dates are available at minimal costs. Intermediate collectors can assemble circulated coins starting from 1932.

Key dates for their circulated collection include 1932-D and 1932-S. they may cost you around $200 due to their low mintage.

Other dates are offered at reasonable prices or lower premium. Advanced collectors can strive for a collection of uncirculated coins from 1932. Expect prices of some to be quite expensive, including 1934-D, 1935-S and 1936-D to name a few.

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Determining Coins’ Value

Many factors are being considered to determine the value of coins. If a dealer runs out of 1965 quarters, you cannot order from the US Mint because they do not make these coins anymore.

Coin dealers usually get their supplies from fellow dealers or some people who want to sell their coins. When you buy from a dealer, the value will be the “retail” price.

Washington quarters are no longer produced because they have long been replaced by the by the state quarters. Circulated Washington quarters are worth their value, which is 25 cents.

Uncirculated ones may hold a premium that dealers may be happy to buy for you. The US only minted a special coin as tribute to the country’s Bicentennial. The average value for uncirculated 1965 Washington quarter is $.40.

References:

Nowadays not many people remember when silver coins actually circulated in America. Up to 1964, our silver coins ~ dimes, quarters, half dollars ~ were made of actual silver. A full 90 percent of each coin was pure silver. The remaining 10 percent was copper. Then, in 1964, the Federal Government decided, with the rest of the world (pretty much), to do away with precious metal in coins and strike them out of cheap alloys. Coins minted from 1965 until now have zero silver content. Dimes, quarters, and half dollars are made of copper with a thin clad layer of nickel.
(Aside -- With the economic turmoil of today, do you think anything would be different if we used real precious metal in coins.pl? Hmmmm.)
If you have old pre-1965 silver coins they are quite valuable today. See this CoinQuest link for details.
Once in a while the thin nickel clad layer is not attached to the coin blank when it is sent into the minting machine. What you get is a clad layer missing error coin and these are sought by collectors. Mint workers are supposed to catch all such errors before the coins leave the mint, but some get through.
Evaluating these coins is a bit tricky. There are several factors which enter into the equation, and all factors are subject to wide variations.
First there is eye appeal. To be valuable, an error coin has to knock your socks off to be valuable. The dime in our picture does that. The obverse ('heads' side) is almost uncirculated, fully lustrous, and pure white, while the reverse ('tails side') has a bright, lustrous red look from the exposed copper. To keep coins in such beautiful condition, owners usually send them to professional coin encapsulation services like PCGS, NGC, ANACS, and ICG (don't use other services).
NEVER CLEAN A COIN. CLEANING RUINS VALUE.
Second there is the actual error configuration. The nickel layer may be missing on one side or both, and it may be partially missing or fully missing.
Third, if you want to sell your coin, you need to find a buyer. There are not many collectors of error coins, so the non-availability of buyers can send prices lower.
Taking these into account, here are some best-guess estimates of the value of missing clad coins:
FULL EYE APPEAL, FULLY UNCIRCULATED, IN NUMISMATIC SLAB:
ONE SIDE MISSING ENTIRE CLAD LAYER
Dimes: $200 US dollars approximate retail value
Quarters: $300
Half dollars: $500
Ike dollars: $600
Susan B. Anthony dollars: $300
ONE SIDE MISSING PARTIAL CLAD LAYER
Dimes: $100 US dollars approximate retail value
Quarters: $150
Half dollars: $250
Ike dollars: $300
Susan B. Anthony dollars: $200
TWO SIDES MISSING ENTIRE CLAD LAYER
Dimes: $400 US dollars approximate retail value
Quarters: $500
Half dollars: $800
Ike dollars: $1000
Susan B. Anthony dollars: $700
CIRCULATED COIN, DULL, WORN, DARK COLORS:
ONE SIDE MISSING ENTIRE CLAD LAYER
Dimes: $20 US dollars approximate retail value
Quarters: $30
Half dollars: $50
Ike dollars: $60
Susan B. Anthony dollars: $30
ONE SIDE MISSING PARTIAL CLAD LAYER
Dimes: $10 US dollars approximate retail value
Quarters: $15
Half dollars: $25
Ike dollars: $30
Susan B. Anthony dollars: $20
TWO SIDES MISSING ENTIRE CLAD LAYER
Dimes: $40 US dollars approximate retail value
Quarters: $50
Half dollars: $80
Ike dollars: $100
Susan B. Anthony dollars: $70
These ballpark values are for retail sales to collectors. If you have such a coin and want to sell it to a coin dealer, figure the dealer will offer your about one-half retail value.

1965 Quarter Value Coins

Coin: 4879, Genre: Errors, Timeline: Modern
Created (yyyymm): 201006, Last review: 201509
Appearance: Normal round coin Metallic brown Metallic gray Letters: Latin Chinese style Flowing style
Years: sort: 1965, filter: 1965 to 2050
Image: us_missing_clad_layer.jpg
Original inquiry: this quarter is a copper quarter from 1986 it is missing the silver alloy from the denver mint which indicates that it was a nickel copper clad

1965 Quarter Error

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